How Mannheim is harnessing social innovation to master the energy transition

Characterised by its proximity to two rivers, the Rhine and the Neckar, as well as its heavy industry, the City of Mannheim in south-western Germany faces an urgent climate challenge. The city has committed to becoming climate neutral by 2050 and is looking into whether this goal can be achieved even sooner. The City of Mannheim is taking on this task, for example, with its Climate Action Plan 2030, climate impact adaptation measures and the provision of funding in cooperation with the Climate Action Agency. Together, they offer consultation, subsidies and a newly created City Lab where residents can get involved in the decision-making process.

Cork City’s many transitions

The small Irish city of Cork has committed to reducing its CO2 emissions by 40% by 2030, compared to the baseline of 2016, and aims for net-zero emissions by 2050. In the diverse business centre, some of the world’s largest tech companies meet a significant agricultural industry producing meat and dairy, showing the importance of including the interests of workers and residents affected by these industries in climate action plans.

“Cuando algo es bueno, llévalo a tu propio ayuntamiento”.

El 17 y 18 de septiembre de 2020, 12 ciudades españolas se reunieron para la primera edición de los Eventos Regionales mPower. El encuentro tenía como pregunta clave, cómo las ciudades pueden asumir un liderazgo más ambicioso en una transición energética democrática y justa. El evento, que estuvo marcado por experiencias compartidas de transición energética de seis de las ciudades participantes, supuso el inicio de un diálogo sobre cómo llevar la soberanía energética a una ciudad y su ciudadanía. ¿Qué se puede aprender cada ciudad, en el ámbito de la eficiencia energética en los edificios, la expansión de las energías renovables de propiedad pública y la participación ciudadana? En esta entrada compartimos algunas de las principales ideas del evento.

Almada: on the way to becoming a low-carbon role model

Located on the south bank of the river Tagus, opposite Lisbon, Almada City Council is one of 18 municipalities within the Lisbon Metropolitan Area, with 180,000 permanent residents living in an area of 72 km2. Despite being mostly urban, Almada still manages to preserve 25% of its territory as a natural protected area of great richness and biodiversity. The city’s Atlantic beachfront extends for approximately 13 km and is a popular leisure destination, attracting an estimated 8 million visitors per year.

‘When something is good, take it to your own town hall!’

On the 17th and 18th of September 2020, 12 Spanish cities* met for the first edition of the mPower Regional Events. The encounter was framed around the question of how cities can take more ambitious leadership in a democratic and just energy transition. Punctuated by more in-depth energy transition stories from six of the cities participating, the event formed the beginnings of a dialogue around how to bring energy sovereignty to a city and its local stakeholders. What could the city officers learn from and with each other in the areas of energy efficiency in buildings, expansion of publicly owned renewables and citizen participation? We share some of the main insights from the event in this blog.

The just transition as a beautiful challenge for municipalities

What can European municipalities learn from each other to build a fair, clean and democratic energy transition? A lot, as our recent mPOWER event proved. On 29 and 30 November, 17 municipalities from all across Europe came together to celebrate the conclusion of the mPOWER Exchange programme. For more than a year, they had been learning together about how to take local leadership in creating a clean, fair and democratic energy system. This blog article recaps the highlights of the celebration event.